The dark side of Nepal

by Marco Sadori

Lying at the feet of the Himalayas, among breathtaking landscapes, ancient temples and one of the most beautiful paths in the world, Nepal is a country that has always had a certain fascination in the imagination of the Westerners. But the grandeur of this country can not completely conceal its dark side

The dark side of Nepal

Photography by Marco Sadori
Story edited by Andrea Mancuso

Lying at the feet of the Himalayas, among breathtaking landscapes, ancient temples and one of the most beautiful paths in the world, Nepal is a country that has always had a certain fascination in the imagination of the Westerners. But the grandeur of this country can not completely conceal its dark side

The grandeur of the Himalayan range with its imposing glaciers. The extraordinary sites of the Kathmandu valley, from Bhaktapur to Patan. The tranquil Pokahara on the shores of Lake Phewa, the sherpa villages with their untouched traditions. Lumbini, the birthplace of Buddha, the fascinating religious rites of the two great Hindu and Buddhist cultures, which coexist peacefully. At the same time, this small country, cramped in a vise between China and India, has a dark side, which lurks in the ravines, behind every corner. Looking more closely at the capital Kathmandu, the living conditions of its inhabitants are evident, all but comfortable. At nightfall, beyond the luxury hotels, part of the city remains in the dark without electricity, turning into a desert and ghostly place. Walking at night, on the streets of the city, illuminated only by the weak beams of light of mobile phones and high-beam cars is an unforgettable experience. The streets of central Kathmandu are often filled with the needy. The poors are sometimes slumped on the ground asking for alms or sometimes they find rest on the steps of a temple. Or inside one of the traditional inns, where the hygienic conditions are often precarious and where for less than one euro you can have a hot momo dish (local ravioli) and a cup of tea. According to the Asian Development Bank: "more than a quarter of the population in Nepal lives below the poverty line". Given this situation, people try to overcome difficulties in different ways. There is a very small part of the population that manages to raise the money needed to emigrate abroad. Those who remain are as accommodated as they can: if on one side the black work of street vendors proliferate, on the other side younger women become vulnerable targets for illegal activities related to sex, cheated with false promises, only to be sent in India (or in other countries) to be forced into prostitution.


AUTHOR
Marco Sadori - www.marcosadori.com
Camera: Nikon D610
Lens: 50mm



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